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Alabama and the New Prevention Fund:
An Investment in the Future Health of America

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) included the creation of a Prevention Fund – to provide communities around the country with more than $16 billion over the next 10 years to invest in effective, provide prevention efforts, like childhood obesity prevention and tobacco cessation.

Alabama is receiving $7,743,851 from the Prevention Fund this year to reduce disease rates in the state and help ensure today's children are not the first generation in U.S. history to live shorter, less healthy lives than their parent.

Preventing disease and injury is the most effective, common-sense way to improve health in the United States. Too often, however, we focus on treating disease and injury after they occur instead of preventing them – providing sick care instead of health care.

The ACA and the Prevention Fund give us the opportunity to turn that around – and provides the opportunity for all Americans to be as healthy as they can be.

Prevention Fund GrantsAmountDescription
Communities Putting Prevention to Work$2.5 Million $13.3 Million*
  • Mobile County, Alabama will build on their past tobacco control successes such as increases in the price of tobacco products in the County and strengthening smoke-free ordinances in four communities by using CPPW support to promote a smoke-free Mobile County, reduce tobacco retail advertising in accordance with state and federal law, and increase the percentage of residents using the Quitline by 15percent.
  • In Jefferson County, Alabama the Smart Code zoning amendment was recently passed. This amendment will increase the number of walkable and livable communities impacting the health of over 113,000 residents in Jefferson County. The zoning amendment allows for compact, mixed-use development in unincorporated areas of the county, more walkable communities centered around villages and transportation nodes, and preserves a greater amount of natural area and open space.
  • Students from close to a dozen higher learning institutions in Jefferson County are lending their support for smoke free campuses. Since the unveiling of its Tobacco Free Campus initiative, the American Lung Association (ALA) and Health Action Partnership have held public events at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham Southern College, Miles College, and Herzing University. The events support the elimination of free samples distribution and price discounts on college and university campuses and will impact over 50,000 students. In addition to the campus events, ALA and the Health Action Partnership are also using technology to support Tobacco Free Campuses. Facebook pages for 10 Jefferson County colleges and universities have been established to garner support from students.
  • The city of Fairfield decided to continue to protect over 11,000 of their residents and workers from exposure to secondhand smoke in all public places, including restaurants, bars, worksites, and bingo halls rather than rescind its smoke free ordinance.
  • In Jefferson County, the Jefferson County Board of Health passed a resolution endorsing the increased availability of cessation products and services in worksite health policies, and the Jefferson County Medical Society adopted two resolutions, the first supports the enactment of local clean indoor air ordinances and the second resolution states that physicians will be encouraged to consider physical activity as an important vital sign during every patient visit and for patients to be effectively counseled as to their level of physical activity and health needs.
  • Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) has adopted two new policies that will help ensure the availability of fresh produce in the schools. School and Community Nutrition Services has implemented one new JCPS policy that calls for a contract with local growers to ensure the availability of seasonal produce in adequate volume to supply demand. A second policy calls for the schools to purchase local produce when in season for storage until times when local produce is not available.
  • All of the Child Nutrition program managers, supervisors, and cafeteria staff for 56 Jefferson County Schools participated in an interactive, experiential training that provided hands on nutrition education and a culinary skills instruction and the schools are now serving new menu items using fresh produce.
  • The Greater Birmingham Community Food Partners convened more than 15 community food advocates to draft a food charter, which will serve as the guiding principles for the new Food Policy Council. More than 300 community, business, and political leaders attended the annual food summit where attendees signed pledge cards in support of both the food charter and the development of a Food Policy Council in Jefferson County.
  • The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama recently purchased a refrigerated truck and is now piloting their first mobile produce pantry. Other strategies to procure fresh produce being examined by the HAP include: reallocating funds for produce; shared maintenance fees on produce; commissioning farmers to grow for the food bank; crop gleaning; and community gardens.
  • In May 2011, the city of Saraland passed a comprehensive smoke-free air policy. The smoke-free air policy prohibits smoking in all public indoor places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The policy will protect over 13,039 residents and visitors in businesses and other public places from exposure to secondhand smoke and help smokers reduce the number of cigarettes consumed or quit entirely.
Public Health InfrastructureAlabama State Department of Public Health $200,000 (FY10); Alabama State Department of Public Health $300,000 (FY11)Awarded to state, tribal, local and territorial health departments to improve their ability to provide public health services. The 5-year cooperative agreement program will provide health departments with needed resources to make fundamental changes in their organizations and practices, so that they can improve the delivery of public health services including: Building and implementing capacity within health departments for evaluating the effectiveness of their organizations, practices, partnerships, programs and use of resources through performance management; Expansion and training of public health staff and community leaders to conduct policy activities in key areas and to facilitate improvements in system efficiency; Maximizing the public health system to improve networking, coordination, and cross-jurisdictional cooperation for the delivery of public health services to address resource sharing and improve health indicators; Disseminating, implementing and evaluating public health's best and most promising practices; and Building a national network of performance improvement managers that share best practices for improving the public health system.
Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases$361,795 (FY10); $992,752 (FY11)The funding, which is provided through Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases (ELC) and the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) cooperative agreements, is intended to increase epidemiology, laboratory and health information systems capacity at health departments. The award is to support: hiring and training of epidemiologists, laboratory scientists, and health information specialists who can work on multiple infectious diseases; increasing the number of modern, well-equipped public health laboratories using electronic laboratory information systems to manage and exchange information effectively between labs and public health departments; and developing capacity for public health departments to participate in meaningful use of electronic health records, e.g. through implementation of electronic laboratory-based reporting according to national standards.
ARRA evaluation (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System)$749,995Grants awarded intended to help states “create additional tobacco quitters,” as well as increase data collection efforts for tracking flu-like illnesses to support ongoing pandemic influenza preparedness activities.
HIV Laboratory$136,711CDC awarded grants to expand HIV prevention efforts under the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS).  The funding, allocated to CDC by the President as part of NHAS, will help to further focus HIV prevention on high risk populations and communities, as well as fill critical gaps in data, knowledge and understanding of the epidemic. The majority of the grants will support demonstration projects to identify and implement a “combination approach” to enhance effective HIV prevention programming in 12 hard-hit areas across the country.  These efforts will determine what mix of HIV prevention approaches can have the greatest impact in the local area, supplementing existing programs in these communities and helping jurisdictions to better focus efforts on key at-risk populations and fulfill unmet needs. Grants went to state and local health departments to increase HIV testing opportunities for populations disproportionately affected by HIV and help link HIV-infected persons with appropriate services, as well as to improve the reporting of HIV data.
HIV Testing$145,567CDC awarded grants to expand HIV prevention efforts under the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS).  The funding, allocated to CDC by the President as part of NHAS, will help to further focus HIV prevention on high risk populations and communities, as well as fill critical gaps in data, knowledge and understanding of the epidemic. The majority of the grants will support demonstration projects to identify and implement a “combination approach” to enhance effective HIV prevention programming in 12 hard-hit areas across the country.  These efforts will determine what mix of HIV prevention approaches can have the greatest impact in the local area, supplementing existing programs in these communities and helping jurisdictions to better focus efforts on key at-risk populations and fulfill unmet needs. Grants went to state and local health departments to increase HIV testing opportunities for populations disproportionately affected by HIV and help link HIV-infected persons with appropriate services, as well as to improve the reporting of HIV data.
HIV Planning$0CDC awarded grants to expand HIV prevention efforts under the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS).  The funding, allocated to CDC by the President as part of NHAS, will help to further focus HIV prevention on high risk populations and communities, as well as fill critical gaps in data, knowledge and understanding of the epidemic. The majority of the grants will support demonstration projects to identify and implement a “combination approach” to enhance effective HIV prevention programming in 12 hard-hit areas across the country.  These efforts will determine what mix of HIV prevention approaches can have the greatest impact in the local area, supplementing existing programs in these communities and helping jurisdictions to better focus efforts on key at-risk populations and fulfill unmet needs. Grants went to state and local health departments to increase HIV testing opportunities for populations disproportionately affected by HIV and help link HIV-infected persons with appropriate services, as well as to improve the reporting of HIV data.
Emerging Infections Program$0The funding is intended to increase epidemiology, laboratory and health information systems capacity at health departments. The award is to support: hiring and training of epidemiologists, laboratory scientists, and health information specialists who can work on multiple infectious diseases; increasing the number of modern, well-equipped public health laboratories using electronic laboratory information systems to manage and exchange information effectively between labs and public health departments; and developing capacity for public health departments to participate in meaningful use of electronic health records, e.g. through implementation of electronic laboratory-based reporting according to national standards.
Capacity Building Grants$0Money awarded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will go to various national, non-profit professional public health organizations to support efforts by state, tribal, local and territorial health departments to ensure successful adoption of effective practices that strengthen core public health infrastructure investments. These national public health organizations will provide technical assistance, training, and information for health departments to improve their public health infrastructure and the delivery of public health services.
Tobacco Prevention$74,227 (FY10); CDC Tobacco Quitlines $105,155 (FY11)State Supplemental Funding for Healthy Communities will be used to help states implement plans to reduce tobacco use through legislative, regulatory, and educational arenas, as well as enhance and expand the national network of tobacco cessation quitlines to significantly increase the number of tobacco users who quit. Money will also support states and terrritories enhance and expand the national network of tobacco cessation quitlines to increase the number of tobacco users who quit. Quitlines are hte toll-free numbers people can call to obtain smoking cessation treatments and services.
Health Care Surveillance$0Grants to fund data collection and analysis to monitor the impact of the Affordable Care Act on the health of Americans and boost the collection and analysis of environmental hazards data to protect the health of communities.
Workforce$0The programs are designed to build the primary care workforce and provide community-based prevention. States will receive funding to support comprehensive workforce planning and implementation strategies that best address local current and projected workforce shortages.
Training Centers—HRSAUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham $649,981 (FY11)The Public Health Training Centers Program helps improve the public health system by enhancing skills of the current and future public health workforce. Funded organizations (1) plan, develop, operate and evaluate projects that support goals established by the Secretary in preventive medicine, health promotion and disease prevention; or (2) improve access to and quality of health services in medically underserved communities. Other PHTC activities include assessing the learning needs of the public health workforce; providing accessible training; and working with organizations to meet strategic planning, education, and resource needs.
Primary care and Behavioral Health Services$0The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at HHS awarded grants to support and promote better primary care and behavioral health services for individuals with mental illnesses or substance use disorders. The grants seek to improve health by improving the coordination of healthcare services delivered in publicly funded community mental health and other community-based behavioral health settings.

*One-Time Funding from FY2010


Trust for America's Health is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to saving lives by protecting the health of every community and working to make disease prevention a national priority. www.healthyamericans.org

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation's largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful and timely change. For more than 35 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. Helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need--the Foundation expects to make a difference in our lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org.

Media Contacts

Albert Lang
(202) 223-9870 x 21
alang@tfah.org